Blog

Contributor: Kim Riddlebarger


Basics of the Reformed Faith: The New Heavens and Earth

Kim Riddlebarger
  When people speak of heaven, they often use images of their favorite places (i.e., the beach, or Yosemite), or they describe some sort of disembodied existence where their immortal soul will finally be set free from the limitations imposed upon it by the human body.  I’ve heard many people…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: The Second Coming

Kim Riddlebarger
  The biblical account of the redemption of our fallen race takes many twists and turns throughout the course of redemptive history.  But the story comes to a glorious resolution when we come to the final chapter of the story.  There is indeed coming a day when all injustices will…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: The Lord’s Supper

Kim Riddlebarger
The Reformed understanding of the Lord’s Supper is grounded in an important distinction between the sign and seal (bread and wine), the thing signified (forgiveness through his blood, the “blood of the covenant”), and a sacramental union between the two (our Lord’s words “this is my body”).  This three-fold distinction…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Baptism

Kim Riddlebarger
  Before our Lord Jesus ascended into heaven, he left his disciples with the following command: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: The Sacraments

Kim Riddlebarger
Although any discussion of the role of the sacraments in the Christian life seems too “catholic” for many evangelical Christians, the sacraments do play a very important role throughout the New Testament.  Summarizing the teaching of Scripture on this topic, the Heidelberg Catechism (Q 65) defines the two New Testament…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Marks and Mission of Christ’s Church

Kim Riddlebarger
The New Testament has no category for someone who is a believer in Jesus Christ but who is not also a member of a local church. The reason is so obvious that we take it for granted. Since all true believers become members of the body of Christ by virtue…
CONTINUE
3 / 20 / 2012

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Good Works and the Christian Life

Kim Riddlebarger
Closely related to the doctrines of justification and sanctification is the subject of good works. One of the most common objections raised by critics of the biblical doctrine of justification by faith alone is this: “If we are saved by grace alone, through faith alone, on account of Christ alone,…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Sanctification

Kim Riddlebarger
It is not until we understand what it means to be justified, that we are in any position to discuss sanctification, which is that life-long process through which the old habit of sin (what we call “indwelling sin”) is progressively weakened and the new nature (given us by virtue of…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Justification

Kim Riddlebarger
Reformed Christians affirm without hesitation that the doctrine of justification is the article of faith by which the church stands or falls. Although the oft-cited comment is attributed to Martin Luther, it was actually the Reformed theologian, J. H. Alsted (1588-1638), who first put these words to paper–no doubt echoing…
CONTINUE

Basics of the Reformed Faith: Election

Kim Riddlebarger
As Americans raised in a democratic republic, we cling tenaciously to the principle “one person, one vote.” It is very easy (and almost natural) to carry over this principle to our understanding of the doctrine of salvation. It is easy to simply assume that God should give everyone a chance…
CONTINUE