Westminster Seminary California
 
 

Valiant for Truth - Creation

Meditations on the Larger Catechism, pt. 12
Danny Hyde

The story goes that there was an astronomer, a biologist, a cosmologist, a geologist, and a physicist who climbed the highest mountain in the world in order to collaborate on determining the origin of life. The astronomer measured the distance to the stars, the biologist examined the smallest life forms deep in the snow, the cosmologist asked the big picture questions, the geologist studied the carbon dating of the rocks, and the physicist determined the makeup of everything they walked on.

 
 
9 / 10 / 2012
 
 
Book Review: God and Creation in Christian Theology by Kathryn Tanner
VFT

The problem of how to correlate God’s sovereignty and human freedom has been a persistent question throughout the history of Christian theology. Rather than offering a full-fledged constructive solution to the God-world relationship, in this work, Kathryn Tanner proposes linguistic rules for coherent Christian discourse about God’s sovereignty and human freedom. According to Tanner, modern theology has been stuck in an irresolvable struggle over the incoherence of its statements concerning the relationship between God’s sovereignty and the dignity of creaturely reality.

 
 
3 / 26 / 2012
 
 
Interview with Dr. VanDrunen on the Two Kingdoms
VFT

If you're interested in learning more about the historic Reformed doctrine of the two kingdoms, you can check out an interview with Dr. VanDrunen

 
 
 
Basics of the Reformed Faith: Divine Image Bearers
Kim Riddlebarger

With the language of the eighth Psalm clearly in mind (“you have made [man] a little lower than the heavenly beings and crowned him with glory and honor” v. 5), Reformed theologian Cornelius Van Til once declared that Adam was created to be like God in every way in which a creature can be like God. 

 
 
1 / 17 / 2012
 
 
Scientists Say We May Be Alone In the Universe
VFT

A recent article reveals that science is not as objective as many would like to think. An scientists from Princeton and the University of Tokyo have challenged one of the commonly accepted theories about the possibility of life on other planets. The currently accepted theory presupposes that out of all of the cosmos, ten thousand planets have the proper conditions to sustain life.